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flut·ter  audio  (fltr) KEY 

VERB:
flut·tered, flut·ter·ing, flut·ters
VERB:
intr.
  1. To wave or flap rapidly in an irregular manner: curtains that fluttered in the breeze.
    1. To fly by a quick light flapping of the wings.
    2. To flap the wings without flying.
  2. To move or fall in a manner suggestive of tremulous flight: "Her arms rose, fell, and fluttered with the rhythm of the song" (Evelyn Waugh).
  3. To vibrate or beat rapidly or erratically: My heart fluttered wildly.
  4. To move quickly in a nervous, restless, or excited fashion; flit.
VERB:
tr.
To cause to flutter: "fluttering her bristly black lashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings" (Margaret Mitchell).
NOUN:
  1. The act of fluttering.
  2. A condition of nervous excitement or agitation: Everyone was in a flutter over the news that the director was resigning.
  3. A commotion; a stir.
  4. Pathology Abnormally rapid pulsation, especially of the atria or ventricles of the heart.
  5. Rapid fluctuation in the pitch of a sound reproduction resulting from variations in the speed of the recording or reproducing equipment.
  6. Chiefly British A small bet; a gamble: "If they like a flutter, Rick will get them better odds than the bookies" (John le Carré).

ETYMOLOGY:
Middle English floteren, from Old English floterian; see pleu- in Indo-European roots

OTHER FORMS:
flutter·er(Noun), flutter·y(Adjective)


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