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Definition of imperative


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im·per·a·tive  audio  (m-pr-tv) KEY 

ADJECTIVE:
  1. Expressing a command or plea; peremptory: requests that grew more and more imperative.
  2. Having the power or authority to command or control.
  3. Grammar Of, relating to, or constituting the mood that expresses a command or request.
  4. Impossible to deter or evade; pressing: imperative needs. See Synonyms at urgent.
NOUN:
    1. A command; an order.
    2. An obligation; a duty: social imperatives.
  1. A rule, principle, or instinct that compels a certain behavior: a people driven to aggression by territorial imperatives.
  2. Grammar
    1. The imperative mood.
    2. A verb form of the imperative mood.

ETYMOLOGY:
Middle English imperatif, relating to the imperative mood, from Old French, from Late Latin impertvus, from Latin impertus, past participle of imperre, to command ; see emperor

OTHER FORMS:
im·pera·tive·ly(Adverb), im·pera·tive·ness(Noun)


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