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la·con·ic  audio  (l-knk) KEY 

ADJECTIVE:
Using or marked by the use of few words; terse or concise. See Synonyms at silent.

ETYMOLOGY:
Latin Lacnicus, Spartan, from Greek Laknikos, from Lakn, a Spartan (from the reputation of the Spartans for brevity of speech)

OTHER FORMS:
la·coni·cal·ly(Adverb)

WORD HISTORY:
The study of the classics allows one to understand the history of the term laconic, which comes to us via Latin from Greek Laknikos. The English word is first recorded in 1583 with the sense "of or relating to Laconia or its inhabitants." Laknikos is derived from Lakn, "a Laconian, a person from Lacedaemon," the name for the region of Greece of which Sparta was the capital. The Spartans, noted for being warlike and disciplined, were also known for the brevity of their speech, and it is this quality that English writers still denote by the use of the adjective laconic, which is first found in this sense in 1589.


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