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Definition of predicate


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pred·i·cate  audio  (prd-kt) KEY 

VERB:
pred·i·cat·ed, pred·i·cat·ing, pred·i·cates
VERB:
tr.
  1. To base or establish (a statement or action, for example): I predicated my argument on the facts.
  2. To state or affirm as an attribute or quality of something: The sermon predicated the perfectibility of humankind.
  3. To carry the connotation of; imply.
  4. Logic To make (a term or expression) the predicate of a proposition.
  5. To proclaim or assert; declare.
VERB:
intr.
To make a statement or assertion.
NOUN:
(-kt)
  1. Grammar One of the two main constituents of a sentence or clause, modifying the subject and including the verb, objects, or phrases governed by the verb, as opened the door in Jane opened the door or is very sleepy in The child is very sleepy.
  2. Logic That part of a proposition that is affirmed or denied about the subject. For example, in the proposition We are mortal, mortal is the predicate.
ADJECTIVE:
(-kt)
  1. Grammar Of or belonging to the predicate of a sentence or clause.
  2. Stated or asserted; predicated.

ETYMOLOGY:
Late Latin praedicre, praedict-, from Latin, to proclaim : prae-, pre- + dicre, to proclaim; see deik- in Indo-European roots

OTHER FORMS:
predi·cation(Noun), predi·cation·al(Adjective), predi·cative(Adjective), predi·cative·ly(Adverb)


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