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slack1  audio  (slk) KEY 

ADJECTIVE:
slack·er, slack·est
  1. Moving slowly; sluggish: a slack pace.
  2. Lacking in activity; not busy: a slack season for the travel business.
  3. Not tense or taut; loose: a slack rope; slack muscles. See Synonyms at loose.
  4. Lacking firmness; flaccid: a slack grip.
  5. Lacking in diligence or due care or concern; negligent: a slack worker. See Synonyms at negligent.
  6. Flowing or blowing with little speed: a slack current; slack winds.
  7. Linguistics Pronounced with the muscles of the tongue and jaw relatively relaxed; lax.
VERB:
slacked, slack·ing, slacks
VERB:
tr.
  1. To make slower or looser; slacken.
  2. To be careless or remiss in doing: slack one's duty.
  3. To slake (lime).
VERB:
intr.
  1. To be or become slack.
  2. To evade work; shirk.
NOUN:
  1. A loose part, as of a rope or sail.
  2. A lack of tension; looseness.
  3. A period of little activity; a lull.
    1. A cessation of movement in a current of air or water.
    2. An area of still water.
  4. Unused capacity: still some slack in the economy.
  5. slacks Casual trousers that are not part of a suit.
ADVERB:
In a slack manner: a banner hanging slack.

PHRASAL VERB:
slack off
To decrease in activity or intensity.

IDIOM:
cut/give (someone) some slack
Slang To make an allowance for (someone), as in allowing more time to finish something.

ETYMOLOGY:
Middle English slak, from Old English slæc; see slg- in Indo-European roots

OTHER FORMS:
slackly(Adverb), slackness(Noun)


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